Category: avia

FAA Inks Aviation Agreements with Brazil and C…

FAA Inks Aviation Agreements with Brazil and Canada:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has signed separate agreements with Brazils Agncia Nacional de Aviao Civil (ANAC) and Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) that will make it easier to approve each countrys aircraft and aviation products for their growing aviation markets.

For many years, the FAA and Brazils ANAC have been cooperating to enhance aviation safety, security, and other areas. Brazil is a member of the quadrilateral Certification Management Team (CMT). They have responsibility for Embraer, the preeminent Brazilian aircraft manufacturer.

The first FAA-ANAC Implementation Procedures Agreement (IPA) was signed in September 2006, with two amendments thereafter, most recently in February 2016. The revision signed today expands the IPA to include Part 23 (General Aviation Aircraft) and provides risk based decision criteria for the U.S. and Brazil to validate each others aviation products.

The latest revision maximizes reliance on each countrys certification authorities and reduces redundant validation activities and resources. It also more closely aligns the IPA with the bilateral agreements of the other CMT partners (the European Union and Canada). The ANAC IPA revision has a 3-month implementation period, which provides much-needed time to familiarize all stakeholders with its content.

The FAA and TCCA also continued their long tradition of cooperation. The two agencies signed a Shared Surveillance Management Plan that defines the process by which they recognize each others surveillance of manufacturers and their suppliers in the United States and Canada.

The Plan ensures manufacturers, certificate holders, production approval holders and suppliers are complying with the responsible countries applicable regulatory requirements. The plan requires manufacturers to comply with an approved quality system and ensure their subcontractors and suppliers also meet the applicable requirements and adhere to quality standards

The result will be less need for FAA and TCCA aviation inspectors to travel to each others facilities to do surveillance. Previously this was done on a case-by-case basis.

September 21, 2018 at 11:56PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Drones and Wildfires Don’t Mix-Period

Drones and Wildfires Don’t Mix-Period:

If you fly your drone anywhere near a wildfire, you could get someone killed.

Thats the stern warning the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and U.S. wildland fire agencies have for pilots of unmanned aircraft (UAS, or more popularly drones) who interfere with fighting wildfires. When firefighting aircraft have to be grounded due to an unauthorized drone flight, there are serious risks not just to first responders but also to anyone in the fires path.

Authorized drone missions by the proper authorities can yield valuable information to firefighters by detecting hotspots, charting a fires spread and the progress in controlling a blaze. But when an unauthorized drone is spotted, they may have to stop all helicopter and airplane operations. Unauthorized drone flights create collision hazards to firefighting aircraft and can distract pilots who are operating in stressful and challenging conditions. Wildland fire agency reports give a sense of how a single errant drone can disrupt operations:

Drone spotted by pilot at eye level during [helicopter] bucket work spotted a drone over fire. All helicopter operations shut downUAS incursion stopped aerial firefighting assets UAS intrusion into TFR (Temporary Flight Restriction). Helicopters disengaged from fire.

If you own a drone, DO NOT fly near or over a wildfire, said FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell. Its against the law, and firefighting aircraft could be grounded, disrupting time-critical firefighting efforts. Your hobby is not worth another persons life.

Most members of the public would never dream of standing in front of a fire engine to stop it from getting to a wildfire, but thats essentially what theyre doing to aerial firefighting aircraft when they fly a drone over or near a wildfire, said Jennifer Jones, spokesperson with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.

If unauthorized drone operations interfere with wildfire suppression, law enforcement, or emergency response efforts, those drone operators could face civil penalties that exceed $20,000 and potential criminal prosecution.

Anyone who witnesses or has information about an unauthorized drone flight over or near a wildfire should immediately contact local law enforcement.

Deterring interference with first responders, as well as giving way to other aircraft in the sky, becomes more important as drone use expands exponentially. The FAAs rules for flying unmanned aircraft are clear. Keep your drone away from other aircraft operations, including aerial firefighting missions.

You just might save someones life.

August 15, 2018 at 10:06PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operatio…

FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operations over DOD Facilities:

At the request of its Federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address concerns about drone operations over national security-sensitive facilities by establishing temporary flight restrictions specific to unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

In cooperation with Department of Defense (DOD), the FAA is establishing additional restrictions on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following Federal facilities:

  • National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) West near St. Louis, MO
  • NGA Next West near St. Louis, MO
  • NGA Arnold near St. Louis, MO

These changes, which are highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/7350, are pending until they become effective on August 30, 2018. Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

Operators who violate the flight restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered locations, can be found on our website.To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, this FAA website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. These restrictions also are depicted in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app.

Additional, broader information regarding flying drones in the National Airspace System, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

The FAA continues to consider additional requests by eligible Federal security agencies for UAS-specific flight restrictions using the Agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.

August 15, 2018 at 08:10PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Heads-Up! Did You Know

  • More than 25 percent of general aviation fatal accidents occur during the maneuvering phase of flight, which is turning, climbing, or descending close to the ground.
  • More than half of the stall or spin accidents occur in the traffic pattern, usually too close to the ground for recovery.

These are ample reasons why you need to brush up on your maneuvering skills.

As a pilot, maneuvering flight operations deserve your full attention, especially during:

  • Take-offs, landings, and go-arounds
  • Stalls and spins
  • Formation, aerobatics, and training
  • Forced/emergency landings
  • Photography

Training is Important

Remember your stall and spin training? You need to revisit it frequently. Try practicing stalls, or approaches to stalls, at a safe altitude with an experienced instructor.

Remember that turns, either vertical or horizontal, load the wings and increase the stall speed.

Other ways to avoid stalls include:

  • Avoid target fixation Focus on flying the airplane, not what is on the ground. Too much focus on the ground can lead to a stall, and you may not recover!
  • No buzzing! Flying low and fast over a target in order to show off your piloting skills is NEVER a good idea and can easily lead to a stall. Buzzing is the cause of 32 percent of maneuvering accidents. Worse yet, theyre usually fatal.

Keep Your Priorities Straight

Finally, here are some maneuvering tips to remember:

  • The slower you go, the more you need to focus on flying the airplane.
  • Minimize distractions, especially when taking off, approaching, descending, and landing.
  • Review all requirements, procedures, and numbers BEFORE you need to use them.
  • Watch your airspeed, and keep your head in the game.

Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control:

Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

This FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Fact Sheet has more information about maneuvering flight.

The FAA Safety Briefing has two articles on maneuvering flight: Getting It Right in Maneuvering Flight in the March/April 2010 issue http://1.usa.gov/1k4CzBG (pdf page 17) and Slow, Steady, Sure in the March/April 2011 issue http://1.usa.gov/1kOqteO (pdf page 22).

Pilots may think that maneuvering flight only includes hazardous operations such as buzzing. But, when you fly in the traffic pattern youre also performing maneuvering flight procedures. This AOPA Safety Advisorwill explain the risks and show you how to avoid them.

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Wings Pilot Proficiency Program is always worth a second look. You can also get WINGS credit for taking the FAASTeams online course, ALC-34 Maneuvering: Approach and Landing, at http://1.usa.gov/1pAC9W3.

Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

August 15, 2018 at 06:59PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Hits 100K Remote Pilot Certificates Issued

FAA Hits 100K Remote Pilot Certificates Issued:

Drones have really taken off! As of today, more than 100,000 enthusiasts have obtained a Remote Pilot Certificate to fly a drone for commercial and recreational (not qualifying as model aircraft) use since the Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) small drone rule went into effect on August 29, 2016.

Under Part 107, the person actually flying a drone formally an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) must have a Remote Pilot Certificate, or be directly supervised by someone with such a certificate. The majority of drone pilots get certified by studying online materials and then passing an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA approved knowledge testing center. You should have no trouble if you study the exam success rate is 92 percent.

If you already have a Part 61 pilot certificate, and have completed a flight review in the previous 24 months, you have the option to take a small UAS online training course provided by the FAA to obtain your certificate.

Its important to remember that a Remote Pilot Certificate is valid for two years from the date of issue. Anyone who earned their certificate at the end of August or in September 2016 should review the certification renewal requirements and prepare to take recurrent training or testing. You can find all the information you need to renew your certificate on our website.

July 26, 2018 at 09:56PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Accepting Controller Applications Nationwi…

FAA Accepting Controller Applications Nationwide:

The Federal Aviation Administration is accepting applications nationwide beginning July 27 from people interested in becoming air traffic controllers. The job announcement may close prior to the listed closing date of July 31 if a sufficient applicant pool has been reached to meet the needs of the FAA.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens, speak English clearly and be no older than 30 years of age (with limited exceptions). They must have a combination of three years of education and/or work experience. They are also required to pass a medical examination, security investigation and FAA air traffic pre-employment tests. Agency staffing needs will determine facility assignment, and applicants must be willing to work anywhere in the U.S.

Accepted applicants will be trained at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, Okla.

Active duty military members must provide documentation certifying that they expect to be discharged or released from active duty under honorable conditions no later than 120 days after the date the documentation is signed.

Interested applicants should visit https://faa.usajobs.gov/to start building their applications orwww.faa.gov/Jobsfor more information about air traffic controllers.

July 24, 2018 at 11:31PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Think Safety First on July 4th

Think Safety First on July 4th:

As you celebrate the Independence Day holiday, keep safety in mind. Know the aviation safety rules while flying your drones and celebrating the 4th.

Here are general guidelines for people flying drones:

  • Dont fly your drone in or near fireworks
  • Dont fly over people
  • Dont fly near airports

To learn more about what you can and cant do with your drone, go to faa.gov/uas or download the B4UFLY app for free in the Apple and Google Play store.

There are also strict rules prohibiting airline passengers from packing or carrying fireworks on domestic or international flights. Remember these simple rules:

  • Dont pack fireworks in your carry-on bags
  • Dont pack fireworks in your checked luggage
  • Dont send fireworks through the mail or parcel services

Passengers violating the rules can face fines or criminal prosecution. When in DoubtLeave it out!

For more information on the passenger rules for fireworks and other hazardous materials, please go to www.faa.gov/go/packsafe/. Leave the fireworks at homeFireworks Don’t Fly poster (PDF).

June 29, 2018 at 09:20PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Surveys Commercial Drone Operators

FAA Surveys Commercial Drone Operators:

If youve registered a commercial drone, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) wants to hear from you.

On June 19, the FAA sent a questionnaire to everyone who has registered a commercial drone more formally, an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for anything but recreational or hobby use. Most of these owners fly their drones for commercial purposes, but the survey population also includes government departments and other users. Hobbyists are not included in this survey.

The goal is to collect information on drone flight activities under the FAAs small drone rule (Part 107), data that will help the FAA improve the services it delivers to the UAS community. Responses to the questionnaire are voluntary and entered 100 percent electronically. The survey will take about 10 minutes to complete.

The questions include areas such as number of drones registered, number and types of missions completed in 2017, primary locations where the operator flies and types of waivers requested. The survey also asks how operators want to get information about drone-related issues from the FAA, and how satisfied they are with the news channels they use now

The questionnaire is completely anonymous, so responses cannot be attributed to an individual.

So if the questionnaire is still sitting on your computer or mobile device, what are you waiting for? We wantand needyour input.

June 30, 2018 at 03:13AM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Establishes Drone Restrictions Over Federa…

FAA Establishes Drone Restrictions Over Federal Prison:

At the request of Federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR)99.7Special Security Instructionsto address concerns about drone operations over national security sensitive facilities by establishing temporary Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) specific flight restrictions.

In cooperation with Department of Justice (DOJ), the FAA is establishing an additional restriction on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following federal facility:

  • Administrative United States Penitentiary Thomson near Clinton, IL

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered DOJ locations, can be found by clicking here.To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, this FAA website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. A link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app.

Additional, broader information regarding flying drones in the National Airspace System, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

These changes, which have been highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/8243, are pending until they become effective on July 7, 2018. Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within this restriction, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

FDC 8/8243 FDC SECURITY SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS (SSI)
PERTAINING TO UNMANNED ACFT SYSTEM (UAS) OPS OVER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. THIS NOTAM SUPPLEMENTS FDC 7/7282, AND DESCRIBES THE CHANGES MADE TO THE UAS-SPECIFIC SSI AIRSPACE DEFINED BY FDC 7/7282 AND IMPLEMENTED PURSUANT TO 14 C.F.R. 99.7 FOR NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE LOCATIONS. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE AN ADDITIONAL LOCATION REQUESTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. THE UPDATED LIST OF AFFECTED AIRSPACE AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTED LOCATIONS, AND OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED AT THE FOLLOWING FAA WEBSITE:HTTP://UAS.FAA.OPENDATA.ARCGIS.COM.

SEE FDC 7/7282 FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THESE SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS.

1806220400-1807060359

Operators who violate the flight restriction may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

The FAA is continuing to consider additional requests by eligible federal security agencies for UAS-specific flight restrictions using the Agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.

June 26, 2018 at 12:33AM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Commissions New Tower at Sarasota Airport

FAA Commissions New Tower at Sarasota Airport:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cut over to a new air traffic control tower at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport early this morning. The new, 128 foot-tall tower will enable air traffic controllers to continue to provide the safest, most efficient service to flights at the busy Florida airport.

Air traffic controllers working in the 525 square-foot tower cab control flights up to 4,000 feet in altitude within a five-mile radius of SRQ; from five to 10 miles from the airport, they handle flights from 1,200 to 4,000 feet in altitude.

A total of 34 FAA employees work at the new facility, 20 in air traffic and 14 in technical operations, which maintains the FAA electronics equipment in the tower and on the airfield.

The FAA and the Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority (SMAA) built the new tower under a unique agreement. The FAA funded the new tower design, engineering and electronic equipment. Agency technicians and engineers installed the electronics and will maintain the equipment. SMAA funded, constructed and owns the new tower. SMAA will maintain the facility, which includes a 9,000 square foot base building that houses equipment, administrative offices and training rooms.

The FAA and SMAA officially will dedicate the new facility in mid-September

June 23, 2018 at 07:19PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji