Category: avia

New PBN Routes Improve Flights to Florida, Car…

New PBN Routes Improve Flights to Florida, Caribbean:

Flights between the Northeast and the major international airports in Florida and the Caribbean are more direct, more efficient, and safer since the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) implemented 55 new Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) routes on November 8.

Satellite-equipped aircraft now can fly new routes that begin at the North Carolina/South Carolina border and flow south toward Florida and the Caribbean. The new routes will augment the existing structure of conventional jet routes. The Agency also updated 11 existing PBN routes. It previously added two PBN routes to the system

Implementing 55 new satellite-based routes on one day is a significant milestone in our work to modernize the air traffic control system, said Dan Elwell, Acting FAA Administrator. We are providing better access to busy airspace along the southern part of the East Coast, to the major international airports in Florida and beyond.

The Agency also is designing high-altitude PBN routes from the northeast to join the new routes that began today. When the new route structure is completed, equipped aircraft will seamlessly fly on satellite-based routes along the East Coast to South Florida and the Caribbean.

The project is part of the FAAs South-Central Florida Metroplex initiative. The Metroplex team designed the new routes, 39 are over water and 16 are over land. This brings the total number of PBN routes over the United States to 316. Get more facts about the South-Central Florida Metroplex on our website.

These new routes, along with other PBN procedures and new technologies are part of the FAAs Next Generation Air Transportation System. NextGen is moving the National Airspace System from ground-based radar to satellite-based navigation, from voice to digital communication, and from point-to-point data to a fully integrated information management system. These initiatives change how we see, navigate, and communicate in our nations skies.

November 16, 2018 at 10:12PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Dedicates New Atlanta Flight Operations Fa…

FAA Dedicates New Atlanta Flight Operations Facility:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today dedicated the new Atlanta Flight Operations Facility at Cobb County International Airport in Kennesaw, GA. The new facility will enable the Agency to continue providing outstanding support of the National Airspace System.

The FAA is pleased to locate our critical flight inspection services out of this state-of-the-art facility, said Teri L. Bristol, Chief Operating Officer of the FAAs Air Traffic Organization. We appreciate the Atlanta communitys support of our continued mission to provide the safest, most efficient airspace system in the world.

Flight Inspection ensures the integrity of instrument approaches and flight procedures that pilots fly in the National Airspace System. FAA pilots fly specially equipped Beechcraft King Air 300 (BE-300) aircraft to conduct airborne inspections of all space- and ground-based instrument flight procedures and they validate electronic signals in space transmitted from ground navigation systems.

The 32,050-square-foot facility includes a 23,100-square-foot hangar that will accommodate six BE-300 aircraft that support Flight Program Operations flight inspection mission. The facility also includes shop space for aircraft maintenance and repair, and administrative space that can accommodate 26 FAA employees.

The Atlanta Flight Operations Facility is part of the FAAs Flight Program Operations service unit in the Air Traffic Organization. The program consolidates all of the agencys aircraft and people into a single organization responsible for all aspects of flight program safety, administration, operations, training, and maintenance.

Other Flight Program Operations facilities are located at Anchorage, AK; Atlantic City, NJ; Battle Creek, MI; Fort Worth, TX; Oklahoma City, OK; Sacramento, CA; and Washington, D.C.

November 16, 2018 at 04:33PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Statement on Las Vegas Tower

FAA Statement on Las Vegas Tower:

On Wednesday evening, an air traffic controller at the Las Vegas tower became incapacitated while on duty. The FAA is deeply concerned by the incident, is thoroughly investigating what occurred, and is taking immediate steps to modify its overnight shift staffing policies. No safety events occurred during this incident. The controller is currently restricted from working air traffic.

November 10, 2018 at 06:27PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Restricts Drones Operating Near DOD and US…

FAA Restricts Drones Operating Near DOD and USCG Mobile Assets:

At the request of the Department of Defense (DOD) and the United States Coast Guard (USCG), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address concerns about potentially malicious drone operations over certain, high-priority maritime operations.

The FAA, in cooperation with DOD and USCG, is restricting drone flights near U.S. Navy (USN) and USCG vessels operating in the vicinity of Naval Base Kitsap in Washington state and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in Georgia. Drone operations are required to maintain a distance of at least 3,000 feet laterally and 1,000 feet vertically from these vessels.

These special security instructions, provided in an FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), are effective today. The full text of this NOTAM and additional information on these special security instructions, including a visual depiction and geospatial definition of the relevant airspace.

The FAA also warns drone operators in this NOTAM that these USN and USCG vessels are authorized by law to take protective action against drones perceived to be safety or security threats such as those violating the cited FAA special security instructions. This action could result in interference, disruption, seizure, damage or destruction of these drones. Further, operators who do not comply with the FAA special security instructions also may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

Any operator with an overriding reason of public interest or necessity (e.g., conducting a search and rescue mission) to operate their drone in close proximity to the cited USN and USCG vessels must first coordinate with the USN or USCG point of contact identified in the website linked above.

In a separate Special Notice Advisory NOTAM, also effective today, the FAA strongly advises drone operators to remain clear of DOD and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and mobile assets, as well as USCG vessels. This Special Notice applies nationwide and alerts operators who ignore this caution and conduct drone flights perceived to be a safety or security threat to these facilities and mobile assets could face a reaction by security forces that results in the interference, disruption, seizure, damage or destruction of their aircraft.

Information can be found here on these two NOTAMs, and all of the locations currently covered by 99.7 restrictions. This website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. Additional information, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

October 26, 2018 at 05:24PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Medications and Flight

Medicine, whether its prescribed or bought over-the-counter, is designed to solve a problem. However, used incorrectly, medicine may create real hazards for pilots. Some drugs can compromise your ability to control the aircraft. These meds can affect your ability to think clearly and make critical decisions quickly and accurately.

The FAA is concerned with a medications side effects in you as well as whether your underlying medical condition allows you to be fit for flight. Level with your doctor, and your Aviation Medical Examiner (AME), and tell him or her about your condition. He or she may be able to treat you in a way that will keep you safe, and in the cockpit.

Dont Be That Pilot

A pilot may decide that he or she can control a medicines effects on the body, and decide to fly anyway. Since a medicines effects can be exaggerated at higher altitudes, that plan could be disastrous.

Another pilot may choose to withhold information, and not tell his or her AME, that he or he has a condition that could compromise safety. Not only could the undisclosed condition endanger the airman, but the treatment could also create problems through drugs that limit peak performance in the cockpit.

  • You must ensure you are fit for flight, and that means being alert, ready, and free from any limiting medications.
  • You must be honest with your AME and tell him or her about any medical conditions you may have, and any medications you are taking. In some cases, he or she can recommend alternative treatment options that could keep you in the air.

Common Meds to Watch For

The FAA is often asked for a list of approved medications, but the FAA does not publish such a list. The reason is that medications change frequently, and while the FAA may approve medications for some diagnoses, those same medications are not approved for others.

What types of side effects should you look out for in medications? One of the most common side effects is drowsiness, which youll often see in antihistamines, a medication used to control allergies. These meds can have powerful sedating effects. In fact, one of them (Benadryl) is often used as a sedative. The NTSB has found that sedating antihistamines are the most common medications found in the bodies of pilots killed in accidents.

The second most common sedating drugs are cardiovascular drugs, which include medications for high blood pressure. Some less common drugs include those used to treat diarrhea, seizures, smoking addiction, and depression. Avoid opioids at all times. If you are taking any of these drugs, work with your doctor and/or AME to see if you can find an alternative.

  • Dont fly while using a medication with which youve previously experienced a negative side effect.
  • If you are using an FAA-approved medication for the first time, see how it affects you before taking flight. Wait 48 hours after taking it and see if you are fit for flight.

For additional information go to: https://www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilotsafetybrochures/media/Meds_brochure.pdf

What if I Have a Medical Condition?

If you have a condition that would disqualify or prevent you from flying, talk to your doctor and/or AME. See if any alternatives are available that will keep you safe.

Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:

The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #FlySafe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control:

Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

This FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Fact Sheet has more information about Pilots and Medications.

Learn more about the possible side effects of common allergy medications in this AOPA bulletin.

This Skybrary article discusses the effects of drugs and alcohol on pilot performance.

Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now including information about the ADS-B Rebate Program.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

October 22, 2018 at 10:45PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Nationwide Emergency Alert System Test Planned…

Nationwide Emergency Alert System Test Planned for Oct. 3:

WASHINGTON FEMA, in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission, will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System and Wireless Emergency Alerts(WEA) on Wednesday, October3, 2018. The WEA portion of the test, which will be sent to consumer cell phones, will begin at 2:18 p.m. EDT.

The test message will appear on consumers phones and read, THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed. Phones will display this national test using the header Presidential Alert. These nationwide alerts, established pursuant to the WARN Act of 2006, are meant for use in a national emergency and are the only type of alert that can be sent simultaneously nationwide by FEMA.

Further details of the event can be found at FEMAs website.

October 03, 2018 at 01:26AM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Approves Nine New LAANC Service Providers

FAA Approves Nine New LAANC Service Providers:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced nine new partners to its Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) initiative, an innovative collaboration between the FAA and the drone industry that provides near real-time processing of airspace authorizations for Part 107 drone operators nationwide who fly in controlled airspace.

Following the FAAs successful prototype, the initiative was simultaneously opened to additional air traffic control facilities and to new industry partners. The five-month onboarding process that began in April resulted in nine new LAANC partners Aeronyde, Airbus, AiRXOS, Altitude Angel, Converge, DJI, KittyHawk, UASidekick and Unifly. The nine join five companies AirMap, Harris Corp., Project Wing, Skyward and Thales Group that have already met the technical and legal requirements to provide LAANC Services.

LAANC uses airspace data, includingUAS facility maps, which shows the maximum altitude around airports where the FAA may authorize operations under Part 107 in controlled airspace. The program gives drone operators the ability to interact with industry developed applications and obtain near real-time authorization from the FAA. LAANC, a foundation for developing theUnmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management System (UTM),is now available at nearly 300 FAA air traffic facilities across the country, covering approximately 500 airports.

The FAA next year will accept applications from parties interested in becoming LAANC service providers from January 7 to February 8 and from July 8 to August 9. This is not a standard government acquisition; there is no Screening Information Request (SIR) or Request for Proposal (RFP) related to this effort. Interested parties can find information on the application process here.

October 01, 2018 at 07:39PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Executive Inducted to Hall of Fame

FAA Executive Inducted to Hall of Fame:

On Friday, Sept. 28, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Assistant Administrator for Human Resource Management Annie B. Andrews was inducted into the 2018 National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame in the Government and Law category.

In accepting the award, Andrews credited the influence of her family on her character, in particular her “role-model” mother Electa. Andrews said, “I am humbled to receive this honor today because the Hall of Fame isnt about the inductee. It is really to honor those people who have paved the path to our success.”

Andrews is a graduate of historically-black Savannah State University in Georgia with an undergraduate degree in criminal justice. She also holds various advanced degrees from other institutions. Prior to coming to the FAA in 2015, Andrews distinguished career includes having served in the U.S. Navy for 32 years, retiring with numerous decorations at flag rank of rear admiral. She is only the third African-American female to achieve that rank in the 243-year history of the U.S. Navy. Before her military service, she worked in Savannahs sheriff department having risen to the rank of captain.

According to the National Black College Hall of Fame Foundation, Inc. website, The Foundation is dedicated to sustaining and growing Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) through alumni recognition, scholarships, training and technical assistance and programs to promote humanitarian involvement.

The hall of fame began in 1986. Other inductees to the hall of fame in the Government and Law Category included some if the nations top legal, political and public-service figures.

Under Andrews leadership, the FAA Office Human Resource Management is a dynamic, world-class organization committed to providing the worlds safest and most efficient aerospace system.

October 01, 2018 at 07:33PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA and NASA celebrate the transfer of new tec…

FAA and NASA celebrate the transfer of new technology:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is optimistic about a National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)-developed technology that promises to increase capacity and reduce delays, fuel burn and emissions.

The FAA, NASA and others from the aviation industry today celebrated the transfer of a technology developed by NASA that will be used by the FAA and airlines.

The new technology, called Flight Deck Interval Management (FIM), integrates with another technology called Terminal Spacing and Sequencing (TSAS) to improve the use of performance-based procedures to make it more efficient to land in congested terminal airspace.

FIM will provide air traffic controllers more precise information as they work to space aircraft coming in on approach. Controllers receive visual aids on their screens that help them execute clearances and conform to sequencing schedules to help aircraft arrive on time. The controller informs the pilot of the aircrafts trajectory and the pilot enters the information into the FIM system.

The information is processed for the pilot through a satellite based navigation tool called Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B). With this information, the pilot assesses what speed to fly to enable them to do a performance based procedure into the airport.

The combined FIM and TSAS tools will provide numerous benefits.

Using performance-based operations, aircraft will spend less time in the air burning fuel and emissions. When aircraft burn less fuel, it saves money for the airlines. Passengers benefit because theres a better chance their flights will arrive on time.

The FAA, NASA and industry are working together under a project called Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration 1 or ATD-1 to bring new technologies to market that are designed to improve arrival times. FIM is one of the technologies that stems from that partnership. Boeing, Honeywell and United Airlines participated in the FIM development and flight test which involved two aircraft from Honeywells flight test fleet as well as a United 737.

September 29, 2018 at 12:55AM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Targets UAS Violators for Enforcement

FAA Targets UAS Violators for Enforcement:

Pilots of unmanned aircraft (drones) who interfere with fighting wildfires, law enforcement efforts, or other first responders, such as medical flights, now are more likely to face serious civil penalties, even for first-time offenses.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has provided guidance for agency personnel who handle possible drone violations to refer all cases involving interference with first responders to the FAA Chief Counsels office for possible enforcement action.

In July 2016, Congress authorized the FAA to impose a civil penalty of not more than $20,000 for anyone who operates a drone and deliberately or recklessly interferes with wildfire suppression, law enforcement, or emergency response efforts.

Under FAA guidance, inspectors generally use non-enforcement methods, including education, for correcting unintentional violations that arise from factors such as flawed systems, simple mistakes, or lack of understanding. However, given the potential for direct and immediate interference with potentially life-saving operations where minutes matter, offenders will immediately be considered for enforcement actions. Enforcement actions can include revocation or suspension of a pilot certificate, and up to a $20,000 civil penalty per violation.

Deterring interference with first responders is critical, particularly as drone use expands exponentially. Firefighting aircraft trying to contain a wildfire have to suspend flights when a drone enters the area to avoid a possible mid-air collision. A drone flying over a crime scene or accident site can hamper police or medical aircraft operations. Ultimately, interference by a drone can cost lives.

The FAAs rules for flying unmanned aircraft are clear. Pilots can save themselves and others serious problems by following them to the letter. Dont let your decision to fly cause someone else to die.

September 28, 2018 at 10:40PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji