Category: avia

Want to be a Controller at the New York TRACON…

Want to be a Controller at the New York TRACON?:

The Federal Aviation Administration is accepting applications beginning June 19 through June 26 from people interested in becoming air traffic controllers at the New York Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility in Westbury, N.Y.

The announcement is open only to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Westbury. They must be U.S. citizens, speak English clearly, and be no older than 30 years of age (with limited exceptions). Applicants must have a combination of three years of education and/or work experience. They must also pass a medical examination, security investigation and FAA air traffic pre-employment tests.

Accepted applicants will be trained at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, Okla.

The New York TRACON manages aircraft flying to, from and over the New York metropolitan area, including the three major airports John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International as well as Teterboro and Long Island MacArthur.

Active duty military members must provide documentation certifying that they expect to be discharged or released from active duty under honorable conditions no later than 120 days after the date the documentation is signed.

Interested applicants should visitwww.usajobs.govto start building their applications orwww.faa.gov/Jobsfor more information about air traffic controllers.

June 19, 2018 at 09:19PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Publishes Means to Comply with Part 23

FAA Publishes Means to Comply with Part 23:

Last August, the final rule overhauling the Part 23 airworthiness standards for general aviation airplanes officially went into effect. Now, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued 63 means of compliance (MOCs) for Part 23 that will foster faster installation of innovative, safety-enhancing technologies into small airplanes, while reducing costs for the aviation industry.

On May 11, the FAA published a notice of availability in the Federal Register accepting 63 MOCs to Part 23 that are based on consensus standards published by ASTM International. The MOCs listed in the notice are an acceptable means, but not the only means, to comply with the applicable regulations in Part 23, amendment 23-64, for normal category airplanes. The public comment period ends July 10.

The FAA participated with industry and other stakeholders in developing these consensus standards. The agency accepted 46 of the ASTM consensus standards as MOCs without change; the other 17 MOCs are a combination of the ASTM standards and FAA changes.

Accepting MOCsbased on consensus standardsto Part 23, amendment 23-64, is consistent with the Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013 and the FAAs stated intent in issuing the overhauled airworthiness rules

A summary of MOCs accepted by this notice is available on the FAA website. Guidance for proposing additional means of compliance to Part 23 for FAA acceptance is provided in Advisory Circular 23.2010-1.

June 11, 2018 at 06:56PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operatio…

FAA Establishes Restrictions on Drone Operations over DOJ and USCG Facilities:

At the request of federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address concerns about drone operations over national security sensitive facilities by establishing temporary Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) specific flight restrictions.

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered locations, can be found on our website.To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, this FAA website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. A link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLYmobile app.

Additional, broader information regarding flying drones in the National Airspace System, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

In cooperation with Department of Justice (DOJ) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the FAA is establishing additional restrictions on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following federal facilities:

  • United States Penitentiary (USP) Tucson near Tucson, AZ
  • USP Atwater near Atwater, CA
  • USP Victorville near Victorville, CA
  • USP Florence High near Florence, CO
  • USP Florence ADMAX near Florence, CO
  • USP Coleman I near Sumterville, FL
  • USP Coleman II near Sumterville, FL
  • USP Marion near Marion, IL
  • USP Terre Haute near Terre Haute, IN
  • USP Big Sandy near Inez, KY
  • USP McCreary near Pine Knot, KY
  • USP Pollock near Pollock, LA
  • USP Yazoo City near Yazoo City, MS
  • USP Allenwood near Allenwood, PA
  • USP Canaan near Waymart, PA
  • USP Lewisburg near Lewisburg, PA
  • USP Beaumont near Beaumont, TX
  • USP Lee near Pennington Gap, VA
  • USP Hazelton near Bruceton Mills, WV
  • United States Coast Guard (USCG) Baltimore Yard, MD
  • USCG Base Boston, MA
  • USCG Base Alameda, CA
  • USCG Base Los Angeles/Long Beach (LALB), CA
  • USCG Base Elizabeth City, NC
  • USCG Base Kodiak, AK
  • USCG Base Miami, FL
  • USCG Base Portsmouth, VA
  • USCG Base Seattle, WA
  • USCG Operations System Center (OSC) near Martinsburg, WV

These changes, which have been highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/8653, are pending until they become effective on June 20. Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

FDC 8/8653 FDC SECURITY SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS (SSI) PERTAINING TO UNMANNED ACFT SYSTEM (UAS) OPS OVER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. THIS NOTAM SUPPLEMENTS FDC 7/7282, AND DESCRIBES THE CHANGES MADE TO THE UAS-SPECIFIC SSI AIRSPACE DEFINED BY FDC 7/7282 AND IMPLEMENTED PURSUANT TO 14 C.F.R. 99.7 FOR NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE LOCATIONS. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS REQUESTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY. THE UPDATED LIST OF AFFECTED AIRSPACE AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTED LOCATIONS, AND OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED AT THE FOLLOWING FAA WEBSITE: https://ift.tt/2AQ45yp.

SEE FDC 7/7282 FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THESE SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS. 1806060400-1806200359

This is the first time the Agency has placed specific flight restrictions for unmanned aircraft, or drones, over Federal Bureau of Prisons and US Coast Guard facilities. The FAA has placed similar flight restrictions over military installations that remain in place, as well as over ten Department of Interior facilities and seven Department of Energy facilities.

Operators who violate the flight restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

The FAA is continuing to consider additional requests by eligible federal security agencies for UAS-specific flight restrictions using the agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.

June 07, 2018 at 07:08PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Issues Final Environmental Assessment for …

FAA Issues Final Environmental Assessment for Cleveland/Detroit Metroplex:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact/ Record of Decision for the Cleveland/Detroit Metroplex project.

The decision enables the agency to move forward with modernized, satellite-based procedures to replace dozens of existing, decades-old conventional air traffic control procedures. Travelers will benefit with safe and more efficient optimized routing through precise flight tracks that keep routes automatically separated. This in turn reduces the need for vectoring and controller-pilot workload.

Prior to making the decision, the FAA conducted a thorough environmental assessment and held public meetings and stakeholder briefings. The agency also evaluated and responded to public comments.

The FAA plans to phasing in the procedures, starting this month and continuing through September 2018. In all, the Cleveland/Detroit Metroplex project includes 71 new satellite-based procedures. This project is a key component of the FAAs Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and a nationwide effort to build the foundation for future safety and efficiency improvements.

The project also expands the number of entry and exit points into and out of the Cleveland/Detroit airspace, which is like creating more on- and off-ramps in the sky. It includes two major airports and 10 satellite airports.

The FAAs environmental analysis for the project calculated noise at locations throughout the study area. It showed the proposed action would not result in any significant noise increases under the National Environmental Policy Act. However, there would be a reportable noise increase that could potentially affect approximately 335 residents in the Sumpter Township, Wayne County, southwest of Detroit Metro Airport.

The FAA held six public workshops on the project before releasing the Draft Environmental Assessment in November of 2017. Agency officials conducted approximately 78 briefings for stakeholders including community groups, airport officials and local, state and federal officials.

Six additional workshops were held after the release of the Draft Environmental Assessment on November 10, 2017.

Additionally, following a 30-day public comment period, the FAA evaluated and responded to comments before making a final decision on the project.

When the Cleveland/Detroit Metroplex procedures are implemented, some people might see aircraft where they did not previously fly. This is because some air route changes will occur, and because satellite-based procedures create more concentrated flight paths than conventional procedures.

Some people will experience slight noise decreases, some will see no changes, and some will experience small noise increases.

Some flight track dispersion will continue to occur after the new procedures are implemented because the Metroplex project would not change a number of existing procedures. Also, air traffic controllers will need to occasionally vector aircraft for safety or efficiency reasons or to reroute them around weather systems.

The Finding of No Significant Impact/ Record of Decision, as well as the Final Environmental Assessment, are available on theCleveland/Detroit Metroplex website, as well as local libraries. You may see them here:http://www.metroplexenvironmental.com/cle_dtw_metroplex/cle_dtw_docs.html

A complete list of libraries with electronic copies is available here: http://www.metroplexenvironmental.com/cle_dtw_metroplex/cle_dtw_introduction.html

Updates on procedure implementation dates will be provided on theproject website.

June 01, 2018 at 10:28PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Modifies Restrictions on Drone Operations …

FAA Modifies Restrictions on Drone Operations over DoD Facilities:

At the request of the Department of Defense, and Federal security and law enforcement agencies, the Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) has been using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address the potential threat posed by malicious drone operations by establishing Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) specific airspace restrictions over select, national security sensitive locations.

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered locations, can be found by clicking here. This linked FAA website provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important information. Alink to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLYmobile app. Additional information, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UASwebsite.

In response to recent requests by Federal agencies, the FAA is establishing new or modifying existing restrictions on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following four sites:

  • Naval Support Activity Monterey, Monterey, CA (new)
  • Naval Air Station Kingsville, Kingsville, TX (new)
  • Naval Support Activity Orlando, Orlando, FL (new)
  • Naval Support Activity South Potomac, Indian Head, MD (boundary change)

These changes, which have been highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/9176, are pending until they become effective on June 1.

FDC 8/9176SECURITY SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS (SSI) PERTAINING TO UNMANNED ACFT SYSTEM (UAS) OPS OVER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. THIS NOTAM SUPPLEMENTS FDC 7/7282, AND DESCRIBES THE CHANGES MADE TO THE UAS-SPECIFIC SSI AIRSPACE DEFINED BY FDC 7/7282 AND IMPLEMENTED PURSUANT TO 14 C.F.R. 99.7 FOR NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE LOCATIONS. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE THE ADDITION OF NEW COVERED LOCATIONS AND THE REVISION OF SOME PRE-EXISTING INDIVIDUAL SSI AIRSPACE. THE UPDATED LIST OF AFFECTED AIRSPACE AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTED LOCATIONS, AND OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED AT THE FOLLOWING FAA WEBSITE: https://ift.tt/2AQ45yp. SEE FDC 7/7282 FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THESE SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS.
01 JUN 04:00 2018 UNTIL 15 JUN 04:00 2018.

Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

Operators who violate the airspace restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

The FAA is continuing to consider additional requests by Federal agencies for UAS-specific airspace restrictions using the FAAs 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.

May 18, 2018 at 10:14PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident can happen when the aircraft exits its normal flight envelope and enters into a stall or spin. If a pilot is not paying close attention, the departure from controlled flight can be a surprise, adding confusion at a time when every second counts.

What is Best Glide Speed?
To answer that question, its best to first look at what youre trying to do. Are you looking for the speed that will get you the greatest distance or the speed that helps you achieve the longest time in the air? Or, are these two the same: the longer you fly, the further you will go?

Distance
If youre looking for distance, youll need to use the speed and configuration that will give you the most distance for each increment of altitude lost. This is called Best Glide Speed, and on most airplanes, it is roughly halfway between Vx (best angle of climb speed) and Vy (best rate of climb speed).

Not all manufacturers publish a best glide speed, but some do, and its a good idea to find the published speed best for your aircraft.

Best glide speed will increase with weight, so many manufacturers will establish this speed at gross weight for the aircraft. This means that your best glide speed will be a little lower for lower aircraft weights.

Time in the Air
If you are more interested in staying in the air as long as possible, then you are looking for minimum sink speed. This speed is rarely found in pilot operating handbooks, but it is a little less than maximum glide range speed.

Check it Out
If youre interested in getting to know these speeds for your specific aircraft, try these experiments on a dual flight with your flight instructor:

  • Start at Vy, or the manufacturers recommended best glide speed with power off, and note speed versus sink rate as you adjust pitch to reduce airspeed. You should do this as close to your typical weight as possible.
  • To identify minimum sink speed, look for the highest speed forward that will give you the lowest rate of descent.

How Far Can I Go?
Knowing how many miles you can glide per 1,000 feet of altitude is another very useful piece of information. Generally, Cessna 152s and 172s will glide 1.5 nautical miles per 1,000 feet of altitude above ground level. Check it out with your aircraft and your flight instructor.

Forced Landing
Practice before you need it! Practice power off approaches at typical mission weights. Doing so will keep these skills from getting rusty.

When practicing a power-off landing, try aiming for a spot a little more than a third of the way down the landing area. Once you are certain you will safely make that spot, add flaps and consider slipping the airplane to steepen your approach and land a little sooner. This will help you reduce the chances of landing short of the runway or entering a stall while trying to stretch the glide to the runway.

Position, Position, Position!!
For any type of gliding approach, youll want to reach a key position on base from which you will know you can make a safe and successful landing. Until you get there, keep your airplane configured for the best glide. After you pass the key position, add flaps and gear to configure the airplane for landing and fly the final approach at 1.3 times the stalling speed in landing configuration (1.3 Vso).

The FAAs Airplane Flying Handbook has several helpful diagrams.

Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

FAA Airplane Flying Handbook Approaches and Landings (Chapter 8).

This handy FAA/GAJSC Fact Sheet will give you what you need to know.

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) WINGS Pilot Proficiency Program has more information.

Time is getting short!! The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

Still not convinced? Learn more about what ADS-B can do for you.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

May 18, 2018 at 09:11PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA & EASA to Host Annual Safety Conference

FAA & EASA to Host Annual Safety Conference:

Be sure to take advantage of the opportunity to network with one of the largest gatherings of aviation safety leaders from around the world.

The Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) will co-host the 17th Annual FAA-EASA International Safety Conference on June 19-21, 2018 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. The three-day gathering will feature more than 15 plenaries, panels and technical sessions on a broad range of international aviation safety topics such as best practices for reducing accident risk through improved technology, safety data and analysis, testing, training and certification.

At the conference, representatives from the FAA, EASA and other civil aviation authorities from around the world will gather with industry representatives from airlines, manufacturers, and trade organizations to discuss measures to enhance aviation safety. The conference will seek to strengthen harmonization of aviation standards worldwide, as well as improve aviation infrastructure and safety oversight capabilities.

Featured speakers include FAA Acting Administrator Daniel K. Elwell, FAA Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety Ali Bahrami and EASA Executive Director Patrick Ky.

Registration is live now, so sign up to attend today!

May 14, 2018 at 09:01PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

DOT Selects 10 Programs for Drone Testing

DOT Selects 10 Programs for Drone Testing:

Accompanied by technology innovators and government leaders from across the nation, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao today announced the 10 state, local and tribal governments who will conduct flight tests as part of theUnmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration Pilot Program. The fields that could see immediate opportunities from the program include commerce, photography, emergency management, public safety, precision agriculture and infrastructure inspections.

May 09, 2018 at 10:53PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Begins Drone Airspace Authorization Expans…

FAA Begins Drone Airspace Authorization Expansion:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has begun expanding an automated system that will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide.

Beginning today, the FAA is phasing in a nationwide beta test of the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) that will deploy the system incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The beta expansion follows successful evaluation of a prototype LAANC system last November.

The first facilities taking part in the beta test are listed on our website. The final deployment will begin on September 13.

LAANC helps support the safe integration of drones into the nations airspace. Drone operators using the system can receive near real-time airspace authorizations. This dramatically decreases the wait experienced using the manual authorization process and allows operators to quickly plan their flights. LAANC uses airspace data provided through temporary flight restrictions, NOTAMS and UAS facility maps that show the maximum altitude ceiling around airports where the FAA may authorize operations under Part 107.

Beginning April 16, the FAA also began considering agreements with additional entities to provide LAANC services. Supplier applications must be made by May 16. Interested parties can find information on the application process on our website. This is not a standard government acquisition; there is no Screening Information Request (SIR) or Request for Proposal (RFP) related to this effort.

The FAA and industry are working together to develop and deploy LAANC applications, which will help set the global standard for a safe, and efficient unmanned traffic management system. It is an important step in developing the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management System (UTM).

April 30, 2018 at 08:46PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

What is a Smart Cockpit?
Imagine taking advantage of the automation available now to make your flight as safe as possible. The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that pilots who use smart procedures, including automated checklists for normal and emergency operations, predictive aircraft performance, and performance monitoring, might help reduce their chances for an accident. Is that a good thing? YES!

The smart cockpit takes advantage of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), electronic ignition and engine control, interconnected devices, and flight information stream flow. ADS-B is the first step:

ADS-B
The ADS-B equipage date is firm: All aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by January 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly within uncontrolled airspace and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt.

Those who have already equipped know the advantages of ADS-B. It provides more precision and reliability than the current radar system. It also provides improved aircraft position data, which is critical in collision avoidance. ADS-B In has a data link for environmental information, which can also be used for air traffic control (ATC) communications , notices to airmen (NOTAM), and up-to-the-minute temporary flight restriction information.

Time is running out! There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have questions, see the FAA Equip ADS-B website.

Electronic Ignition and Engine Control
If your car has a start button, you know what this is all about. Electronic Engine Control (EEC) systems are more reliable, more efficient, and less costly to purchase and maintain than analog systems. EECs evaluate input from engine and environmental sensors hundreds of times per minute, which keep your engine running at peak efficiency for your operational environment. Those same sensors will also give you a clear picture of your power plants health. If theres a problem, a light will let you know you need to schedule maintenance.

Interconnected Devices
Interconnected devices turn your cockpit into an information powerhouse. Air-to-ground data links can provide air traffic clearances and instructions as well as current weather and field condition reports and NOTAMs.

Link your phone to access even more information safely and securely. Youll be able to see where youre going without fumble-fingering your route. Information is transferred directly from your flight plan to your aircraft.

This is not technology of the future. Its here and ready to use, today!

Flight Information Stream
With a flight information stream, you can get complete information on your aircrafts health from a variety of internal and external sources that are available now, or will be soon. This information can be formed, updated, and presented in a graphical and text form.

In the future, ATC communications and aircraft configuration will be integrated, and smart checklists for normal and emergency operations will appear as needed.

With all that information, the aircraft will be able to predict performance in takeoff, cruise, approach, and landing operations. Imagine knowing how much runway youll need for every take-off and landing!! Smart!

By taking advantage of the smart systems available, youll increase the safety and efficiency of your aircraft, and youll have a lot more time to do what you enjoy the most: flying!

Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

More about Loss of Control
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:
There are only 21 months left! FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

Still not convinced? Learn more about what ADS-B can do for you.

This GA Safety Enhancement Fact Sheet will show you how you can improve your personal efficiency with a Smart Cockpit. Or, watch this video.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. Find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements.It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGAJSCis comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

April 24, 2018 at 11:41PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji