Category: avia

U.S. Department of Transportation Announces Final Rule to Enhance Air Carrier Pilot Development:

The rule requires specific training for newly-hired pilots and supplemental training for captains.

February 25, 2020 at 10:40PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

New Members Join the Drone Advisory Committee:

WASHINGTON The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has appointed two new members to theFederal Aviation Administrations (FAA)Drone Advisory Committee(DAC).

The new members are Christian Ramsey, President of uAvionix Corp., headquartered in Bigfork, MT, and Lee Moak, founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Moak Group in Washington, D.C. They were appointed on February 5, 2020.

The DAC is a broad-based, long-term federal advisory committee that provides the FAA advice on key unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) integration issues by helping to identify challenges and prioritize improvements. The committee helps to create broad support for an overall integration strategy and vision.

Members of the DAC are executives who represent a variety of UAS interests, including industry, research, academia, retail, technology and state and local government.

The DAC is chartered to have up to 35 members. Twelve members were previously added to the DAC on May 20, 2019, to fill open vacancies.

February 21, 2020 at 05:00PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Addressing GA Safety:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about safety, including loss of control (LOC), powerplant failure, and controlled flight into terrain (CFIT).

Stay safe! Thisserieswill show you how you can incorporate safety into every flight.

What Is Mountain Flying?
Flying over mountains can offer beautiful scenery and views you just cant get from the ground. Whether its the Sierra Nevadas, the Rockies, or the Appalachians, mountain flying is often an unforgettable experience. However, keep in mind that mountain flying also involves more risks than flying over the flatlands.

Flying in mountainous areas is challenging, not only because operational altitudes and winds are higher, but also because weather reporting and off-airport landing opportunities are fewer than in other flight environments. Thus, while there are fewer accidents in mountainous areas than in the flatlands, mountain flying accidents are more likely to result in fatalities.

Keep in mind also that the conditions of mountain flying can be found in many areas that are considered to be non-mountainous. For example, density altitudes over 8,500 feet can be found over the eastern plains of Colorado in the summer. Mechanical turbulence and even mountain waves can be found in areas that arent considered to be mountainous.

Know Before You Go
Mountain flying is precise flying, and its made safer by using every available clue about the weather and the terrain. While all flying involves risk, mountain flying brings even more challenges. You need to be on your toes, think quickly, and weigh your options. You will need to fully understand your abilities as a pilot, and the limitations of your aircraft.

For starters, its essential that you attend a recognized mountain flying course, which is a good first step in giving you the knowledge and skills you will need. Contact your local FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam Rep) or an FAA Flight Standards District Office for references.

A good rule of thumb is to have about 150 hours of pilot-in-command time under your belt before you take mountain training. These hours will give you the experience you need to be familiar and comfortable with your aircraft. Youll also have gained greater experience with flight planning.

Mountain flying can stretch your abilities to fly the airplane proficiently as you navigate and confront weather challenges. There are many dos and donts of mountain flying, and its important that you take the time to understand all of them.

  • Dont allow yourself to be pressured into completing a flight. Mountain flying requires you to think clearly and evaluate quickly. Understand your aircraft, and know how to read the weather.
  • Dont fly too close to rough terrain or cliffs, even for that perfect picture.
  • Dont fail to recognize that air, although invisible, acts like water and will flow along the contours of the mountains and valleys. Visualize where the wind is coming from, and imagine what water would do in the same situation.
  • Do recognize that frost and air density are real threats with mountain flying. Understand how they both could affect your aircrafts performance.
  • Do ensure your aircraft is properly fueled and that you have survival equipment onboard.
  • Dont be too proud to check with experienced mountain pilots when you have a question.
  • Do consider a training course! Training is essential to fully understand all the challenges with mountain flying.

The Final Word
Fly regularly with a flight instructor who will challenge you to review what you know, explore new horizons, and to always do our best.

Be sure to document your achievement in the WINGS Proficiency Program. Its a great way to stay on top of your game and keep your flight review current.

Did you know?
Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.

There is an average of one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Resource Guide:

This FAA Safety Video will give you a good introduction to Mountain Flying, as well as this 57 Seconds to Safer Flying video.

This FAA Fact Sheet will give you solid, helpful tips.

A long list of dos and donts can be found in this FAA Tips document.

The FAAs Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge covers aircraft performance in Chapter 11 here.

Chapter 5, Section 7-5-6 of the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) covers Mountain Flying.

The NTSB has prepared this important Safety Alert on Mountain Flying.

This AOPA Safety Advisor also has excellent tips.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

February 20, 2020 at 10:31PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao Announces $520.5 Million in Airport Grants:

Grants will help keep our nation’s airports in good shape and make air travel a better experience for passengers.

February 19, 2020 at 10:53PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Mark Your Calendar for the 2020 UAS Symposium:

WASHINGTON The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) will co-host the 5th Annual FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Symposium on June 16-18, 2020, at the Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD.

The Symposium will bring together representatives from the FAA, other government agencies, industry, and academia. The presenters and panelists will discuss the latest information and advancements related to the diverse uses of unmanned aircraft, and how these new entrants are being safely integrated into the National Airspace System.

Like in previous years, the FAA will operate an on-site resource center to respond to questions from UAS owners and operators. Subject matter experts will be on hand to answer questions about airspace authorizations, waivers, the Part 107 small UAS rule, changes in hobbyists drone operations, the Remote Identification rulemaking,and other policies and regulations.

With interest in UAS technology, uses and operations at an all-time high, the Symposium is an opportunity for commercial remote pilots and drone enthusiasts to get the latest information on the burgeoning industry from leading experts in the field.

To receive updates on event programming and registration please visit the symposium website.

FAA Contact: Marcia Alexander-Adams; Email: marcia.adams@faa.gov; Phone: 202-267-3488
AUVSI Contact: Tom McMahon; Email: tmcmahon@auvsi.org; Phone: 571-255-7786

February 07, 2020 at 04:52PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Vapes on a Plane?:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with other federal agencies and organizations to remind airline passengers that electronic smoking devices like vaporizers (vapes) and e-cigarettes are considered hazardous materials when transported on aircraft.

Electronic smoking devices contain lithium batteries that pose a fire risk. Passengers are allowed to bring the devices on board but they must be appropriately packed. Vapes, e-cigarettes and spare lithium batteries must be placed in carry-on luggage only. Vapes and e-cigarettes should be carefully protected to prevent the device from accidentally turning on. Place the vapes or e- cigarettes in a protective case or remove the battery and place each battery in its own case or plastic bag to prevent a short circuit.

Just as passengers are not allowed to smoke cigarettes on an aircraft, they should never use their vapes or e-cigarettes on an aircraft. Its not only dangerous, its a federal offense.

The FAA encourages manufacturers, retailers and consumers of vapes and e-cigarettes to learn and promote the rules on flying with these products by sharing messaging from a new Vapes On A Plane Marketing Kit.

More information about packing safely for air travel can be found on the Pack Safe web page.

January 18, 2020 at 06:19AM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

South Florida is a “No Drone Zone” During Super Bowl LIV:

MiamiHard Rock Stadium near Miami is a No Drone Zone for Super Bowl LIV on Feb. 2, 2020. Drones also are prohibited around the Miami Beach Convention Center for the NFL Super Bowl Experience and Bayfront Park for Super Bowl Live during the days leading up to the event.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will establish a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) on game day that will prohibit drones within a 30-nautical-mile radius of the stadium up to 18,000 feet in altitude. The TFR will be in place from 5:30 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. EST. Drones are also prohibited for one nautical mile around Hard Rock Stadium on February 2 from 9 a.m. until the TFR for the game takes effect. Further details are available in the drone TFRs.

The FAA will restrict drone flights for roughly one nautical mile around the Miami Convention Center and Bayfront Park up to an altitude of 2,000 feet from January 25 to February 1 during daytime hours. Pilots and drone operators who enter the TFRs without permission could face civil penalties that exceed $30,000 and potential criminal prosecution for flying drones in the TFR.

Detailed information for general aviation and drone pilots is available on the FAA’s Super Bowl LIV web page.

Drone pilots should check the FAAs B4UFly app to determine when and where they may fly. To highlight the No Drone Zone, watch the FAAs videos in English and Spanish encouraging fans to enjoy the game and leave their drones at home.

January 16, 2020 at 05:02PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Holding Information Meetings on LaGuardia AirTrain:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is holding Public Information Sessions on the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed LaGuardia AirTrain tonight and tomorrow night in Queens, N.Y.

The FAA will be sharing the results of the draft alternatives analysis. The agency still is developing the Draft EIS (DEIS), which is planned for release in Summer 2020 after the impact analyses have been completed. At that time, the public will have the opportunity to learn about and comment on the DEIS at formal public hearings.

The sessions are designed to educate attendees about the agencys analysis of the alternatives that were developed during the scoping phase of the project. The open house format will display project information, and FAA representatives will be available to answer questions. The FAA will not accept comments at the sessions this week. There will be a formal comment period when the DEIS is published.

The sessions will be from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., January 14 and 15, at the New York LaGuardia Airport Marriott, 102-05 Ditmars Boulevard, East Elmhurst, N.Y. 11369.

For more information, please visit the project website.

January 14, 2020 at 10:15PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

FAA Opens One-of-a-Kind Fire Research Facility in Atlantic City:

Atlantic City, N.J.– The FAA completed construction and opened a new indoor fire research facility in December to conduct performance tests of potential replacement fire extinguishing agents.

The work conducted in this new $5 million, 2,500 square-foot facility will support research on fluorine-free firefighting foams.

The fully enclosed fire-test facility will eliminate weather related variables in testing and enhance data collection capabilities. It will also contain and collect the byproducts of fire testing chemicals and prevent any contamination of the surrounding area and ground water, allowing for more frequent and efficient testing.

Construction of the new facility started in November 2018 and FAA researchers began testing this month.

The FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 directed the Agency to stop requiring the use of fluorinated chemicals in aircraft firefighting foams within three years. Fluorine-free foams on the market today do not match the performance of their fluorinated counterparts.

The current firefighting foam is a highly effective combatant to jet fuel fires, but it has also generated concerns over potential environmental and health impacts. Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a potentially hazardous group of chemicals found in current firefighting foams used at airports.

January 14, 2020 at 08:16PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji

Fly Safe: Addressing GA Safety:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about safety, including loss of control (LOC), powerplant failure, and controlled flight into terrain (CFIT).

Stay safe! Thisseries will show you how you can incorporate safety into every flight.

Keep Your Focus
Interruptions and distractions may be brief, but they can be deadly. They can cause you to lose focus, which could lead to catastrophic errors.

Interruptions and distractions break your train of thought, but at times can convey information that is critical for safe flight. The key is to learn how to safely manage the inflow of competing information.

Examples of interruptions/distractions include air traffic control (ATC) communications or alerts, head-down work, or having to deal with an unexpected situation. If not managed properly, distractions can set a deadly chain of events in motion.

Pilots are trained to manage several tasks concurrently, and for the most part, this is a skill pilots execute well. However, its important that you avoid becoming preoccupied with one task over all the others. Do you remember the December 1972 L-1011 crash, where the crew became so preoccupied with a landing gear light malfunction that they failed to notice that someone had erroneously turned off the autopilot? Similar events can happen to the GA pilot. Dont let it happen to you!

Reduce the Risk

  • Realize that you may have control over some interruptions and distractions, and not over others.
  • Realize that the actions under your control, like head-down work, including standard operating procedures and checklists, should be conducted during periods of minimal disruption.
  • Observe the FAAs sterile cockpit rule, and make sure your passengers understand your need to focus at critical junctures of the flight.
  • Keep communications clear and concise.

Responding to Abnormal Conditions
Because some interruptions and/or distractions may be subtle, the first priority is to recognize and identify them. Then, you will need to re-establish situational awareness. Identify what you were doing, and where you were in the process when you were distracted. Determine what action you need to take to get back on track.

Prioritization is key. Remember:

  • Aviate
  • Navigate
  • Communicate, and
  • Manage

Be ready to postpone some lower-priority actions until you are in a position to safely address them.

More Tips on Dealing with Distraction:

  • Recognize that conversation is a powerful distracter.
  • Recognize that head-down tasks greatly reduce your ability to monitor the status of the aircraft.
  • Schedule or reschedule activities to minimize conflicts, especially during critical phases of flight.
  • When two tasks must be performed at the same time, avoid letting your attention linger too long on either task.
  • Remember that your job as pilot in command is to fly the aircraft. That is your primary focus.
  • Treat interruptions as red flags.
    – Remember, Interruptions Always Distract
    Identify the interruption when it occurs.
    Ask, What was I doing before I was interrupted?
    Decide what action you will need to take to get back on track.

The Final Word
Fly regularly with a flight instructor who will challenge you to review what you know, explore new horizons, and to always do your best.

Be sure to document your achievement in the Wings Proficiency Program. Its a great way to stay on top of your game and keep your flight review current.

Did you know?
Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.

There is an average of one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Resource Guide:

Review this FAA Safety Team Fact Sheet on managing unexpected events.

The Flight Safety Foundation publishes a Tool Kit that can help you manage the deadly duo of interruptions and distractions.

ASA has also created a helpful checklist that will help you balance competing information.

AOPA has these tips on distraction management.

The FAA Safety Briefing has an article on strategies to help you overcome your startle response in the Sep/Oct 2019 issue.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Program helps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements.It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

January 13, 2020 at 11:27PM Source:FAA.gov News and Updates https://ift.tt/2aTM6Ji